Showing posts with label Church Celebrations. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Church Celebrations. Show all posts

Saturday

Have a Wonderful Christmas!

“For to us a child is born, to us a son is given, and the government will be on his shoulders. And he will be called Wonderful Counselor, Mighty God, Everlasting Father, Prince of Peace”
(Isaiah 9:6 NIV)

HAVE A BLESSED AND MEANINGFUL CHRISTMAS
AND A HAPPY NEW YEAR
TO EVERYONE.

taken inside the Cathedral of Strasbourg, France last Dec. 2010. We visited the Christmas market in this city.

Tuesday

Happy All Saints Day

All Saints' Day (in the Roman Catholic Church officially the Solemnity of All Saints and also called All Hallows or Hallowmas[3]), often shortened to All Saints, is a solemnity celebrated on 1 November by parts of Western Christianity, and on the first Sunday after Pentecost in Eastern Christianity, in honour of all the saints, known and unknown.

Here is an inspiring story forwarded by Kyregma in my inbox.

CALLED TO HOLINESS

We begin this month of “prayers for the dead” by celebrating the lives of saints who have gone before us. Each year, the Church gives us the Gospel of the Beatitudes. Jesus is the New Moses who ascends the mountain to speak out the necessary attitudes to be able to follow Him. Every saint has followed Jesus in his lifetime and now receives his just reward. Where they go, we hope to follow.

The Beatitudes are the very heart of Jesus expressed to us in His life and ministry. As Jesus declares the blessedness of such people, He is stating that those who are obedient and live out these beatitudes are deeply joyful and experience well-being. It is more than just being happy. Blessedness points to an interior attitude of heart, mind and body. As Rabbi, Jesus takes His seat and teaches the disciples the following beatitudes — a common position of the Jewish Rabbi. As we reflect upon His words, it seems a tall order to follow.

Being poor, meek, mournful, hungry, thirsty and persecuted are, in fact, ways of blessedness or fullness of well-being. It is a stark contrast to what the world teaches us to follow. The world teaches us to compete, strive, achieve and succeed. These are all exceptional qualities of a human being. However, we must consider these in the light of Jesus’ teaching. Otherwise, they are folly.

All of us are called to be saints. The saints we remember today were very normal people like us. However, the saint is a sinner open to the transcendent grace and power of the Lord. Their weakness is transformed and sanctified. They seek to follow Jesus not counting the cost. Think of your own patron saint. Did they fit these criteria of the Beatitudes? Seek their intercession today so that you would be a person of the Beatitudes. Fr. Brian Steele, MGL

Reflection Question:
You are a saint by virtue of your baptism. How do you live up to that privilege?

God, our Father, You called us to be saints. Sanctify our lives and let us live the way of holiness. Grant this through Christ, our Lord. Amen.

Blessed Paul Navarro, pray for us.

Monday

Feast of the Assumption of Mary

According to the belief of Christians of the Roman Catholic Church, the Eastern Catholic Churches, Eastern Orthodoxy, Oriental Orthodoxy, and parts of the Anglican Communion and Continuing Anglicanism, the Assumption of Mary was the bodily taking up of the Virgin Mary into Heaven at the end of her life. The Roman Catholic Church teaches as dogma that the Virgin Mary "having completed the course of her earthly life, was assumed body and soul into heavenly glory." This doctrine was dogmatically and infallibly defined by Pope Pius XII on November 1, 1950, in his Apostolic Constitution Munificentissimus Deus. This belief is known as the Dormition of the Theotokos by the Eastern and Oriental Orthodox Churches. In the churches which observe it, the Assumption is a major feast day, commonly celebrated on August 15. In many countries it is a Catholic Holy Day of Obligation.

In his August 15, 2004, homily given at Lourdes, Pope John Paul II quoted John 14:3 as one of the scriptural bases for understanding the dogma of the Assumption of Mary. In this verse, Jesus tells his disciples at the Last Supper, "If I go and prepare a place for you, I will come again, and will receive you to myself; that where I am, you may be there also." According to Catholic theology, Mary is the pledge of the fulfillment of Christ's promise.
more here

Sunday

Have a Wonderful Easter To Everyone!

A time to celebrate and rejoice! Our Saviour finally rose! To give us hope in this uncertain world! Have a lovely and wonderful Easter to one and all! God bless us!
Glitter Graphics

See the land, her Easter keeping,
Rises as her Maker rose.
Seeds, so long in darkness sleeping,
Burst at last from winter snows.
Earth with heaven above rejoices...

~Charles Kingsley

Friday

What is Good Friday

Just sharing for now about Good Friday! have a meaningful and blessed Easter! here it is;

Good Friday, also called Holy Friday, Black Friday, or Great Friday, is a religious holiday observed primarily by adherents to Christianity commemorating the crucifixion of Jesus and his death at Golgotha. The holiday is observed during Holy Week as part of the Paschal Triduum on the Friday preceding Easter Sunday, and often coincides with the Jewish observance of Passover.

Based on the scriptural details of the Sanhedrin Trial of Jesus, the Crucifixion of Jesus was most probably on a Friday. The estimated year of Good Friday is AD 33, by two different groups, and originally as AD 34 by Isaac Newton via the differences between the Biblical and Julian calendars and the crescent of the moon. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Good_Friday

Thursday

What is Maundy Thursday

To have more understanding about Lenten Season especially the celebration of Maundy Thursday, I have here an article about it..just to let you know ..have a blessed Holy Week to all!

"Maundy Thursday

The feast of Maundy (or Holy) Thursday solemnly commemorates the institution of the Eucharist and is the oldest of the observances peculiar to Holy Week. In Rome various accessory ceremonies were early added to this commemoration, namely the consecration of the holy oils and the reconciliation of penitents, ceremonies obviously practical in character and readily explained by the proximity of the Christian Easter and the necessity of preparing for it. Holy Thursday could not but be a day of liturgical reunion since, in the cycle of movable feasts, it brings around the anniversary of the institution of the Liturgy. On that day, whilst the preparation of candidates was being completed, the Church celebrated the Missa chrismalis of which we have already described the rite (see HOLY OILS) and, moreover, proceeded to the reconciliation of penitents. In Rome everything was carried on in daylight, whereas in Africa on Holy Thursday the Eucharist was celebrated after the evening meal, in view of more exact conformity with the circumstances of the Last Supper. Canon 24 of the Council of Carthage dispenses the faithful from fast before communion on Holy Thursday, because, on that day, it was customary take a bath, and the bath and fast were considered incompatible. St. Augustine, too, speaks of this custom (Ep. cxviii ad Januarium, n. 7); he even says that as certain persons did not fast on that day, the oblation was made twice, morning and evening, and in this way those who did not observe the fast could partake of the Eucharist after the morning meal, whilst those who fasted awaited the evening repast. more infos here

Lenten Season: A Time for Repentance, Fasting and Abstinence

The Season of Lent is not only the time for repentance, fasting and abstinence but also the celebration about the death and resurrection of Jesus Christ. I cannot forget this Catholic teachings because I attended Catholic schools during High School and College. A lot of people probably don't have any idea about the Celebration of Lenten Season but I know that a lot also have knowledge on how Christ died on the cross to save us from the poverty of sins. I know I am a sinful person. I am not perfect and can never be perfect. At least I always try my best to do what is supposed to be done. That is the reason why I have to repent for my sins and do penance for it.

There might be some people whom I also offended and I really felt sorry for that.
I always tried my best to be a friend to everybody. But sometimes I just can't make all people happy. I always tried to understand but there are just people who don't want to understand. I always try to forgive but some people don't really understand the spirit of forgiveness. Since Lenten season is a season to repent for our sins and to forgive other people's offences, I hope that I can always extend my understanding and forgiveness. I always tried..But I believed one way to avoid sinfulness is also to avoid people who make you prone to sinfulness. Please correct me if I am wrong. To those whom I hurt or maybe did something wrong, I apologize for my sinfulness. I hope and pray that God will also forgive all the transgressions and sins that I committed. Peace to everyone and have a blessed Lenten Season!

Tuesday

Happy St. Patrick's Day!

Are you familiar with St. Patrick? I read a newspaper last weekend about St. Patrick's Celebration in Munich, Germany. They will be having a parade today to commemorate this celebration. For those who are not familiar with St. Patrick, here is a little information about him.

Saint Patrick's Day (Irish: Lá ’le Pádraig or Lá Fhéile Pádraig), colloquially St. Paddy's Day or simply Paddy's Day, is an annual feast day which celebrates Saint Patrick (circa AD 385–461), one of the patron saints of Ireland, and is generally celebrated on March 17.

The day is the national holiday of Ireland. It is a bank holiday in Northern Ireland and a public holiday in the Republic of Ireland and Montserrat. In Canada, Great Britain, Australia, the United States, and New Zealand, it is widely celebrated but is not an official holiday.

St. Patrick's feast day was placed on the universal liturgical calendar in the Catholic Church due to the influence of the Waterford-born Franciscan scholar Luke Wadding[2] in the early part of the 17th century, although the feast day was celebrated in the local Irish church from a much earlier date. St. Patrick's Day is a holy day of obligation for Roman Catholics in Ireland. The feast day usually falls during Lent; if it falls on a Friday of Lent (unless it is Good Friday), the obligation to abstain from eating meat can be lifted by the local bishop. The church calendar avoids the observance of saints' feasts during certain solemnities, moving the saint's day to a time outside those periods. St. Patricks Day is very occasionally affected by this requirement. Thus when March 17 falls during Holy Week, as in 1940 when St. Patrick's Day was observed on April 3 in order to avoid it coinciding with Palm Sunday, and again in 2008, having been observed on 15 March.
source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saint_Patrick%27s_Day

Monday

Feast of the Immaculate Conception

I could still remember my school days before wherein we always celebrate the Feast of Immaculate Conception. As far as I can remember, I am always happy when this day comes..first reason, we don't have a class...second we only need to attend a Mass..third we have some games and activities in school which means fun for me during those days.. Having attended Notre Dame Schools back home from high school to College, I really extend my thanks and gratitude to my mentors and teachers who had helped me mold of what I am now. Respect to all of you! I might not grew up perfectly but at least, the values and teachings that these great people had imparted to me are still there and always reminds me to do whatever things I need to do and if possible always do the right thing. I could even remember one teacher who said, "Do whatever things you want to do, as long as you do it the right way". I know I am not perfect and will never be perfect at all, the most important thing which I believed is that, I am always trying my best to do whatever is good for me especially to my family and I hope to my friends too and people around me. I know I can't always make people happy but at least I am trying...What I just keep on hoping and praying is that, I hope that I will be given more patience, passion, calmness and most of all the spirit of forgiveness. I will try and try and try..

So what is really Feast of the Immaculate Conception is all about..before I will end this personal post..Please visit this site, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Immaculate_Conception for more info about this topic.

The Immaculate Conception is, according to Roman Catholic dogma, the conception of the Virgin Mary without any stain ("macula" in Latin) of original sin. It is sometimes also called the Immaculata, particularly in artistic contexts. The dogma thus says that, from the first moment of her existence, she was preserved by God from the lack of sanctifying grace that afflicts mankind, and that she was instead filled with divine grace. It is further believed that she lived a life completely free from sin. Her immaculate conception in the womb of her mother, by sexual intercourse, should not be confused with the doctrine of the virginal conception of her son Jesus.

The feast of the Immaculate Conception, celebrated on 8 December, was established as a universal feast in 1476 by Pope Sixtus IV. He did not define the doctrine as a dogma, thus leaving Roman Catholics freedom to believe in it or not without being accused of heresy; this freedom was reiterated by the Council of Trent. The existence of the feast was a strong indication of the Church's belief in the Immaculate Conception, even before its 19th century definition as a dogma.

In the Roman Catholic Church, the Solemnity of the Immaculate Conception is a Holy Day of Obligation, except where conferences of bishops have decided, with the approval of the Holy See, not to maintain it as such. It is a public holiday in some countries where Roman Catholicism is predominant.

Tuesday

Merry Christmas

I would like to extend my warmest greetings to each and everyone!!
Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year!!
Got this cute graphic from my former classmate and friend Aileen in friendster.
Thanks Leen for the greetings..wish you the same!!

159611r9vclh2r4c.gif

Sunday

What is Advent

Advent (from the Latin word adventus, meaning "coming") is a season of the Christian church, the period of expectant waiting and preparation for the celebration of the Nativity of Jesus, in other words, the period immediately before Christmas. It is the beginning of the Western Christian year and commences on Advent Sunday. The Eastern churches begin the liturgical year on 1 September.[1] The Eastern Christian equivalent of Advent is called the Nativity Fast but it differs both in length and observances.

The progression of the season may be marked with an Advent calendar, a practice introduced by German Lutherans. At least in the Roman Catholic calendar, Advent starts on the fourth Sunday before December 25; in other words, the Sunday between November 27 and December 3 inclusive.

Latin adventus is the translation of the Greek word parousia, commonly used in reference to the Second Coming. Christians believe that the season of Advent serves a dual reminder of the original waiting that was done by the Hebrews for the birth of their Messiah as well as the waiting that Christians today endure as they await the second coming of Christ.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Advent

Wednesday

Church Mass

The second mass I attended in England. I guess, this is the Church in Westminster, London if I'm not mistaken. A lot of nationalities from all over the world attended the Holy Mass!! It was a jolly and inspiring mass celebration! A photo I took inside the Church.

Friday

Assumption of Mary

Just sharing this article about the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary which is always commemorated every 15th August..

have a blessed day to all!!
the Altar of the Blessed Virgin Mary in St. Ullrich Church,
a Catholic Church here in Hohenfels, Germany

Please visit http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Assumption_of_Mary for more infos!!!

Assumption of Mary

According to Roman Catholic theology and Catechism, the Virgin Mary, "having completed the course of her earthly life, was assumed body and soul into heavenly glory."[1] This means that Mary was transported into Heaven with her body and soul united. The feast day recognizing Mary's passage into Heaven is celebrated as The Solemnity of the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary by Roman Catholics. This doctrine was dogmatically and infallibly defined by Pope Pius XII on 1 November 1950 in his Apostolic Constitution Munificentissimus Deus. The Assumption of Mary into heaven is also taught by the Eastern Orthodox Church and the Oriental and Coptic Orthodox Churches, where it is known as the Dormition of the Theotokos. In those denominations that observe it, the Assumption is commonly celebrated on August 15, a Holy Day of Obligation in the Roman Catholicism.

In his August 15, 2004 homily given at Lourdes, Pope John Paul II quoted John 14:3 from the Bible as a scriptural basis for understanding the dogma of the Assumption of Mary, where Christ, in his Last Supper discourses, explained that "When I go and prepare a place for you, I will come again and will take you to myself, that where I am, there you may be also". According to Catholic theology, Mary is the pledge of the fulfillment of Christ's promise. However, many theologians disagree with this interpretation of Scripture, and believe that Christ was speaking about his preparation of Calvary and the crucifixion for the remission of sins.

Wednesday

Wordless Wednesday



The Easter eggs near our Church..afar is a small chapel and Mary's Grotto

Sunday

Happy Easter!!!

HAPPY EASTER TO ALL MY FRIENDS!! Don't forget to vote for me at SalasWildthougths...
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Happy Easter Sunday!!

The English term, according to the Ven. Bede (De temporum ratione, I, v), relates to Estre, a Teutonic goddess of the rising light of day and spring, which deity, however, is otherwise unknown, even in the Edda (Simrock, Mythol., 362); Anglo-Saxon, eâster, eâstron; Old High German, ôstra, ôstrara, ôstrarûn; German, Ostern. April was called easter-monadh. The plural eâstron is used, because the feast lasts seven days. Like the French plural Pâques, it is a translation from the Latin Festa Paschalia, the entire octave of Easter. The Greek term for Easter, pascha, has nothing in common with the verb paschein, "to suffer," although by the later symbolic writers it was connected with it; it is the Aramaic form of the Hebrew pesach (transitus, passover). The Greeks called Easter the pascha anastasimon; Good Friday the pascha staurosimon. The respective terms used by the Latins are Pascha resurrectionis and Pascha crucifixionis. In the Roman and Monastic Breviaries the feast bears the title Dominica Resurrectionis; in the Mozarbic Breviary, In Lætatione Diei Pasch Resurrectionis; in the Ambrosian Breviary, In Die Sancto Paschæ. The Romance languages have adopted the Hebrew-Greek term: Latin, Pascha; Italian, Pasqua; Spanish, Pascua; French, Also some Celtic and Teutonic nations use it: Scottish, Pask; Dutch, Paschen; The correct word in Dutch is actually Paasen Danish, Paaske; Swedish, Pask; even in the German provinces of the Lower Rhine the people call the feast Paisken not Ostern. The word is, principally in Spain and Italy, identified with the word "solemnity" and extended to other feasts, e.g. Sp., Pascua florida, Palm Sunday; Pascua de Pentecostes, Pentecost; Pascua de la Natividad, Christmas; Pascua de Epifania, Epiphany. In some parts of France also First Communion is called Pâques, whatever time of the year administered.

adapted:Newadvent

Saturday

Holy Saturday

In the primitive Church Holy Saturday was known as Great, or Grand, Saturday, Holy Saturday, the Angelic Night, the Vigil of Easter, etc. It is no longer, like Maundy Thursday, a day of joy, but one of joy and sadness intermingled; it is the close of the season of Lent and penance, and the beginning of paschal time, which is one of rejoicing.

By a noteworthy exception, in the early Church this was the only Saturday on which fasting was permitted (Constit. Apost., VII, 23), and the fast was one of special severity. Dating from the time of St. Irenaeus, an absolute fast from every kind of food was observed for the forty hours preceding the feast of Easter, and although the moment assigned for breaking the fast at dawn on Sunday varied according to time and country, the abstinence from food on Holy Saturday was general.

The night of the vigil of Easter has undergone a strange displacement. During the first six or seven centuries, ceremonies were in progress throughout the entire night, so that the Alleluia coincided with the day and moment of the Resurrection. In the eighth century these same ceremonies were held on Saturday afternoon and, by a singular anachronism, were later on conducted on Saturday morning, thus the time for carrying out the solemnity was advanced almost a whole day. Thanks to this change, special services were now assigned to Holy Saturday whereas, beforehand, it had had none until the late hour of the vigil.

This vigil opened with the blessing of the new fire, the lighting of lamps and candles and of the paschal candle, ceremonies that have lost much of their symbolism by being anticipated and advanced from twilight to broad daylight. St. Cyril of Jerusalem spoke of this night that was as bright as day, and Constantine the Great added unprecedented splendour to its brilliancy by a profusion of lamps and enormous torches, so that not only basilicas, but private houses, streets, and public squares were resplendent with the light that was symbolic of the Risen Christ. The assembled faithful gave themselves up to common prayer, the singing of psalms and hymns, and the reading of the Scriptures commentated by the bishop or priests. The vigil of Easter was especially devoted to the baptism of catechumens who, in the more important churches, were very numerous. On the Holy Saturday following the deposition of St. John Chrysostom from the See of Constantinople, there were 3000 catechumens in this church alone. Such numbers were, of course, only encountered in large cities; nevertheless, as Holy Saturday and the vigil of Pentecost were the only days on which baptism was administered, even in smaller churches there was always a goodly number of catechumens. This meeting of people in the darkness of the night often occasioned abuses which the clergy felt powerless to prevent by active supervision unless by so anticipating the ceremonies that all of them could take place in daylight. Rabanus Maurus, an ecclesiastical writer of the ninth century (De cleric. Instit., II, 28), gives a detailed account of the ceremony of Holy Saturday. The congregation remained silent in the church awaiting the dawn of the Resurrection, joining at intervals in psalmody and chant and listening to the reading of the lessons. These rites were identical with those in the primitive Church and were solemnized at the same hours, as the faithful throughout the world had not yet consented to anticipate the Easter vigil and it was only during the Middle Ages that uniformity on this point was established.
adapted: Newadvent


Last Supper painting inside St. Bartholome Church in Frankfurt..
I personally took these photos last march 15, 2008 during our trip there.

Christ Crucified.. one of the Stations of the Cross Monument
inside the Imperial cathedral in Frankfurt..

Friday

Why Do The Station of the Cross

The most important reason for reviving the practice of making the Stations of the Cross is that it is a powerful way to contemplate, and enter into, the mystery of Jesus' gift of himself to us. It takes the reflection on the passion out of my head, and makes it an imaginative exercise. It involves my senses, my experience and my emotions. To the extent I come to experience the love of Jesus for me, to that extent the gratitude I feel will be deep. Deep gratitude leads to real generosity and a desire to love as I have been loved. First, just a note about the history of the stations:

The History:

From the earliest of days, followers of Jesus told the story of his passion, death and resurrection. When pilgrims came to see Jerusalem, they were anxious to see the sites where Jesus was. These sites become important holy connections with Jesus. Eventually, following in the footsteps of the Lord, along the way of the cross, became a part of the pilgrimage visit. The stations, as we know them today, came about when it was no longer easy or even possible to visit the holy sites. In the 1500's, villages all over Europe started creating "replicas" of the way of the cross, with small shrines commemorating the places along the route in Jerusalem. Eventually, these shrines became the set of 14 stations we now know and were placed in almost every Catholic Church in the world.


Why Put Them On the Web?

We do this for the same reason we have done the Daily Reflections and the Online Retreat on the web - accessibility. It would be wonderful if each of us would find the time to explore our church, or a classic church in town, and make the stations there, going from station to station. However, it is much easier to imagine almost anyone with a computer going through these stations, any time, day or night.
What if I have never made the Stations before?
Go to the page on "How to do the Stations" and see how simple it is. On the web, it's easy. I can do one a day, for two weeks. I can do several at a time, and just do them, when I get a chance. I can do all 14 at a time, and return to them in my prayer and imagination as I do them.

The most important thing to remember is that this can be as personal as I'd like it to be. One of our common religious struggles is to realize that we are not alone. The Good News is that Jesus entered into our life's experience completely - even suffering and death - and that he fell into the hands of a Loving God, who raised him from death to life. We can have complete hope that suffering and death have no complete hold on us. We will all share eternal life with him, if we can fall into the hands of the same Loving God. And, along the way, we are not alone. Jesus is with as one who knows our suffering, and the death we face. That can be deeply consoling.

So try the stations, and experience the consolation they offer. And return often, to be renewed in this intimate experience of Jesus' solidarity with all humanity in our way of the cross each day.

FAQ's About Holy Week

Frequently Asked Questions

1. Why is Holy Week So Important?
Holy Week is important because it commemorates the events of Christ's final days and passion. This includes the institution of the Eucharist and the crucifixion. Obviously, Christ's institution of the Eucharist and his passion and death are important in many ways, especially in terms of their importance in the reconciliation of God and humanity (the atonement). Holy Week commemorates these important events, and is therefore a very busy time in the life of the Church. For an article explaining why Catholics spend so much time at church during Holy Week, check out You're at Church A Lot During Holy Week...How Strange.

2. Why Doesn't My Church Observe Holy Week?
There are various possibilities. Perhaps your particular church considers Holy Week to be unbiblical (although the whole week is based explicitly on Scripture). Some denominations that came out of the "Radical Reformation" got rid of the Church Year, believing it to be a manmade tradition. Another possibility is that your church believes Holy Week is outdated and places too much emphasis on sin and guilt. A final reason may be that your pastor is not familiar with the rich meaning behind Holy Week, which means you should send him to this site.

3. What are the Western Catholic Fast Guidelines for Good Friday?
Fasting means eating only one full meatless (no animal flesh) meal on this day. However, one may still eat a breakfast and even a lunch in addition to a full meal if the two additional small meals do not add up to a second full meal. Snacking is not allowed. Drinking coffee, tea, juices, etc, between meals is permitted on fast days. The requirements are slightly different for those of certain ages. Fasting is only required of those from ages 18-59, although parents are expected to teach their children the reasons behind their fasting, etc. Those with health conditions are excluded. Note that some Western Bishop Conferences, Eastern Catholic Rites, and Orthodox Christians have different fasting guidelines, so it is wise to check with your local parish about expectations. These are simply the minimum expectations. Additional forms of self-denial, within reason, can also be spiritually beneficial.

4. What is the Paschal Triduum?
The Paschal Triduum, often called the Easter Triduum or simply the Triduum, consists of Holy Thursday, Good Friday, Holy Saturday, and Easter Sunday. This includes the Great Easter Vigil, the high point of the Triduum. The word Triduum comes from the Latin word meaning "three days." It begins the evening of Maundy Thursday and ends at Evening Prayer on Easter Sunday. Thus the Triduum consists of three full days which begin and end in the evening. The Triduum is not part of Lent (at least liturgically), but Holy Thursday and Good Friday are still reckoned as part of the traditional forty days of Lent. The Triduum celebrates the heart of our faith and salvation: the death and resurrection of Christ, and is thus the high point of the liturgical year.

adapted from: Churchyear